Close
Close

Colourfree Baby Drops 1-2 Months

Close

Colourfree Suspension 1-5 Years

Close

Chewable Tablets 3+

Close

Suppositories 6 Months - 5 Years

Close

Colourfree Suspension 5-12 Years

Close

Elixir 5 - 12 Years

Close

Suppositories 5-12 Years

Close

Soluble 7+

Close

Panadol Tablets

Close

Panadol Caplets with Optizorb Formulation

Close

Panadol Tablets with Optizorb Formulation

Close

Panadol Mini Caps

Close

Panadol Suppositories

Close

Panadol Extra Caplets

Close

Panadol Rapid Soluble

Close

Panadol Rapid Caplets

Close

Panado Rapid Handipak

Close

Panadol Osteo

Close

Panadol Cold & Flu + Decongestant

Close

Panadol Cold & Flu MAX Hot Lemon

Close
Panadol Colour-Free Baby Drops 1-2 Years

Colourfree Baby Drops 1 Month - 1 Year

  • Concentrated Drops
  • 1 Month - 1 Years
  • Gentle on Tiny Tummies
  • 500mg Paracetamol
    No gluten, lactose or sugar
Close
panadol colour-free suspension 5-12 years

Colourfree Suspension 1-5 Years

  • Suspension
  • 1-5 Years
  • Strawberry/Orange Flavour
  • Active Ingredient: Paracetamol 24 mg/mL
Close
Panadol Chewable Tablets

Chewable Tablets 3+

  • Dissolvable Tablets
  • 1-5 Years
  • Perfect For Travel
  • Active Ingredient: 120mg of Paracetamol per tablet
Close
Panadol Suppositories 6months-5years

Suppositories 6 Months - 5 Years

  • Suppositories
  • 6 Months - 5 Years
  • For vomiting
  • Active ingredient: Paracetamol 125mg per suppository.
Close
panadol colour-free suspension 1-5 years

Colourfree Suspension 5-12 Years

  • Suspension
  • 5-12 Years
  • Strawberry/Orange Flavour
  • Active ingredient: Paracetamol 48 mg/mL
Close
Panadol Elixir 5-12 Years

Elixir 5 - 12 Years

  • Suspension
  • 5-12 Years
  • Fast & gentle relief
  • Active ingredient: Paracetamol 48 mg/mL
Close
Panadol Suppositories 5-12 Years

Suppositories 5-12 Years

  • Suppositories
  • 5-12 Years
  • For vomiting
  • Active ingredient: 250mg Paracetamol per suppository
Close
Panadol Soluble 7+

Soluble 7+

  • Effervescent Tablets
  • 7+ Years
  • Absorbed quicker
  • Active ingredient: Paracetamol
Close
Panadol Tablets

Panadol Tablets

  • Tablets
  • 12+ Years
  • Basic Pain
  • Active ingredient: 500mg Paracetamol
Close
Panadol Caplets With Optizorb Formulation

Panadol Caplets with Optizorb Formulation

  • Caplets
  • 12+ Years
  • Quicker Absorbtion
  • Active ingredient: 500mg Paracetamol
Close
Panadol Tablets With Optizorb Formulation

Panadol Tablets with Optizorb Formulation

  • Tablets
  • 12+ Years
  • Quicker Absorbtion
  • Active ingredient: 500mg Paracetamol
Close
Panadol Mini Caps

Panadol Mini Caps

  • Caplets
  • 12+ Years
  • Easier to swallow
  • Active ingredient: 500mg Paracetamol
Close
Panadol Suppositories

Panadol Suppositories

  • Suppositories
  • 12+ Years
  • For vomiting
  • Active ingredient: 500mg Paracetamol per suppository.
Close
Panadol Extra

Panadol Extra Caplets

  • Caplets
  • 12+ Years
  • Fight Tough Pai
  • Active ingredient: 500mg Paracetamol , 65mg caffeine
Close
Panadol Rapid Handipak

Panadol Rapid Soluble

  • Dissolvable Tablets
  • 12+ Years
  • Absorbed 2x Faster
  • Active ingredient: 500mg Paracetamol
Close
Panadol Rapid Caplets

Panadol Rapid Caplets

  • Caplets
  • 12+ Years
  • Absorbed 2x Faster
  • Active ingredient: Paracetamol
Close
Panadol Rapid Handipak

Panado Rapid Handipak

  • Caplets
  • 12+ Years
  • Absorbed 2x Faster
  • Active ingredient: 500mg Paracetamol
Close
Panadol Osteo

Panadol Osteo

  • Tablets
  • 12+ Years
  • Up to 8 hours
  • Active ingredient: 665mg Paracetamol
Close
Panadol Cold & Flu + Decongestant

Panadol Cold & Flu + Decongestant

  • Caplets
  • 12+ Years
  • With Decongestant
  • 500mg Paracetamol
Children's Coughs

Children's Coughs

Coughs and colds are common in childhood, with kids catching up to six or more colds per year.i, ii Usually a cough gets better on its own and is not serious. If your child is feeding, drinking, eating and breathing normally and there’s no wheezing, a cough isn’t usually anything to worry about. However, if their cough becomes worse or doesn’t go away, it may be a sign of a deeper issue (such as a chest infection, asthma or pneumonia) and you should consult with your doctor.ii

Article Tile Image
Main Article Image
Image Style Article

Ultimately, understanding the different types of cough that your child may develop means you’ll know the best way to manage them – and when to seek medical help.

Understanding Your Child’s Cough

Why Do Coughs Happen?

Coughing is a natural bodily reflex designed to help clear your child’s lungs and expel mucus from their airways.iii, iv  For this reason, you don’t want to stop a child from coughing completely – but it’s important to monitor the child’s cough and consult your doctor if it is causing them consistent discomfort or pain, or appears to be getting worse.ii

 

What Causes a Cough?

The most common cause of a cough is a respiratory tract infection, such as a cold or flu. Other causes of coughing include an allergy, asthma, or an irritant such as dust or cigarette smoke.iv Sometimes a child can develop a ‘habit’ cough – a repetitive cough without any obvious underlying disease, which requires reassurance and minimal further investigation..v

Find out what to do when your baby or child has a cold.

Article Left Side Image
Tablet Article Left Side Image

Common Coughs and Their Symptoms

  • A cough with a cold: A chesty, ‘wet’ cough that often worsens at night.vi Lying down can cause mucus to drip from the nose and mouth into the windpipe (a postnasal drip), triggering the cough reflex.vii, viii Treatment for a cold usually includes bed rest, plenty of fluids and staying warm. Age-appropriate paracetamol, such as Panadol Colour-Free Suspension 1-5 Years, help to reduce your child’s fever and any accompanying headache or muscle aches.ix
  • An asthmatic cough: This is a cough where your child wheezes and has difficulty breathing. It tends to be worse at night and after exercise. Consult your doctor regarding the best asthma treatment for your child. They may recommend an asthma relief medication such as an inhaler.x

Relieving Your Child’s Cough – The Do’s and Don’ts

  • DO encourage your child to wash their hands regularly and cover their mouth when coughing or sneezing. Viral infections are spread through direct contact with infected secretions in the air or on contaminated surfaces such as door handles.xiv
  • DO monitor your child’s temperature. A reading of over 38°C is generally a sign of a fever.xv Paracetamol can help lower this and there are Children’s Panadol products suitable for babies, toddlers and children.xviii Consult with your doctor first before giving your child any medicine.
  • DO offer frequent drinks to keep them hydrated.xvi
  • DON’T assume your child needs antibiotics for a cough they will not help if a cough is caused by a viral infection.xvii
  • DON’T put other children in the sick child’s bed at night, as this may spread the virus.xiv
  • DON’T give over-the-counter cough medicines to any child aged six or younger.xvi, xvii
Article Right Side Image

Coughs in Children – When Should I Seek Advice?

A cough is a common symptom which is commonly caused by a cold. Usually a cough gets better on its own and is not serious.ii However, if your child has trouble breathing or becomes more unwell, speak to your doctor as soon as possible. If your baby is under three months and shows signs of a high fever with their cough, seek immediate medical attention.xv

SOURCES

By clicking any of the links below you will be taken to an external website that is independently operated and not managed by GSK. GSK assumes no responsibility for the content on the website. If you do not wish to leave this website, do not click on the links below.

i.Childhood illnesses. Health Direct. https://www.healthdirect.gov.au/childhood-illnesses. Accessed 25/06/19.

ii.Coughs, colds and ear infections in children. Health Direct. https://www.healthdirect.gov.au/coughs-colds-and-ear-infections-in-children. Accessed 20/02/20.

iii.Cough and Sputum Production. NCBI. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK359/pdf/Bookshelf_NBK359.pdf. Accessed 20/02/20.

iv.Cough. NHS Inform. https://www.nhsinform.scot/illnesses-and-conditions/lungs-and-airways/cough. Accessed 20/02/20.

v.Cough. The Royal Children’s Hospital Melbourne. https://www.rch.org.au/connect/prereferral_guidelines/Cough/. Accessed 11/12/19.

vi.Cough. Health Direct. https://www.healthdirect.gov.au/cough. Accessed 20/02/20.

vii.Cracking the cough code. Harvard Medical School. https://www.health.harvard.edu/diseases-and-conditions/cracking-the-cough-code. Accessed 20/0/20. 

viii.Coughing. Kids Health. https://kidshealth.org/en/parents/childs-cough.html. Accessed 20/02/20.

ix.Common cold. NHS. https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/common-cold/. Accessed 20/02/20.

x.Asthma. Royal Children’s Hospital Melbourne. https://www.rch.org.au/kidsinfo/fact_sheets/Asthma/. Accessed 20/02/20.

xi.Common Colds: Protect Yourself and Others. CDC. https://www.cdc.gov/features/rhinoviruses/index.html. Accessed 20/02/20. 

xii.Fever in children. Royal Children’s Hospital Melbourne. https://www.rch.org.au/kidsinfo/fact_sheets/Fever_in_children/. Accessed 20/02/20. 

xiii.First aid: Coughing. Kids Health. https://kidshealth.org/en/parents/cough-sheet.html. Accessed 20/02/20.

xiv.Cough. Health Direct. https://www.healthdirect.gov.au/cough. Accessed 20/02/20.

xv.Paracetamol for children. NHS. https://www.nhs.uk/medicines/paracetamol-for-children/. Accessed 28/02/20.